THE INDIGENIZATION AND POLITICIZATION OF AMERICAN ISLAM

  • Liyakat Takim McMaster University, Canada

Abstract

The increased presence and visibility of Muslims in America in the past century means that Islam is no longer to be characterized as a Middle Eastern or South Asian phenomenon. Given the fact that it is the fastest growing religion in America, Islam is now a very American phenomenon. The face of American Islam has changed dramatically especially after the events of September 11, 2001. This article will examine the impact that recent events have had on the American Muslim community and will focus on increasing political engagement by members of the community. It will examine the political experience of American Muslims and will discuss how community members have come together to try to change the American political landscape.

Keywords: Indigenization, politicization, CAIR, ISNA

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Published
2017-01-10